Myrtle (red)

Latin Name: Myrtus communis

Common Name: Myrtle (aka Common Myrtle, Corsican Pepper, Wax Myrtle)

Botanical Name: Myrtus communis

Botany: An evergreen shrub or small tree that grows to 15 feet tall with dark green leaves.

History: Myrtle has been known for its antiseptic properties since the Ancient Greeks.  In Greek mythology it is sacred to the goddesses Aphrodite and Demeter.  In Roman mythology it is dear to Venus. In Jewish tradition it is one of four sacred plants of the Feast of Tabernacles. Myrtle appears in the writings of Hippocrates, Pliny, Dioscorides, Galen and the Arabian writers.

Origin: Italy

Plant Part: Leaf

Extraction Method: Steam distilled

Cultivation Method: Ethically farmed

Fragrance: Woodsy, slightly camphoraceous

Color of Oil: Pale yellow

Keyword: Clearing

Note: Top Note

Blends well with: Bay Laurel, Bergamot, Cardamom, Cinnamon, Clary Sage, Clove, Coriander, Eucalyptus, Ginger, Hyssop, Lavandin, Lavender, Lemon, Lemongrass, Lime, Peppermint, Rosewood, Rosemary, Sandalwood, Spearmint, Thyme, Tea Tree

Therapeutic Benefits - Mind: Myrtle is a balancing oil that has a sedative effect which may soothe anger.

Therapeutic Benefits - Body: Myrtle is an astringent. It is a cleansing skin tonic for oily skin, acne, and psoriasis. Myrtle benefits the respiratory system as an expectorant and helps with asthma, bronchitis, lung infections, and chronic coughs. It eases gastro-urinary problems like diarrhea, cystitis, urethritis, and hemorrhoids. Myrtle also promotes a restful sleep.

Therapeutic Benefits - Spirit: Myrtle encourages unconditional love and forgiveness.

Chemical Constituents: 1,8-cineole, alpha-pinene, limonene, linalool

Common Adulterants: Cineole (synthetic or bioidentical)

Application Method: Dilute 10 drops in 1 oz carrier oil, massage oil, or lotion and apply to skin or bath. Use 4 drops in 2 cups of hot water for a steam.

Warnings: None.

Color Energy: Light Blue - Drying

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